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Lost Space

Part 2 Project 2001
Amanda Wanner
David Dickerson
David Proctor
University of Liverpool Liverpool UK
The body of work was formed about a process, as a way of looking at and mapping the urban fabric. In order to discuss issues such as, "Why urban regeneration?", the project used the notion of 'lost space' as a vehicle. This allowed the group to investigate issues of regeneration that are specific to Liverpool, and in particular of Granby-Toxteth.

The mapping investigations aimed to uncover and construct differing ways to classify, and therefore respond to situations. The resulting drawings were intended to lie between the traditional socio-economic and phenomenological precedents of mapping the city. As a result of this investigation, a series of drawings were produced whose language was evolved from the specific issues they discussed. This can be seen in the polarised nature of some of the drawings; the delicacy of line employed within some of the drawings against the sweeping zonal nature of others.

This 'process' of mapping evolved a series of moves. These moves were essentially driven by questioning the critical mass of interventions, by using public urban space as a regenerative tool, and by the proposed strategies from existing agencies operating within Liverpool. This created, not concrete propositions, but generated programmes to understand the level of intervention required to transform the interstitial nature of specific spaces to that of destination.

Amanda Wanner
David Dickerson
David Proctor


Looking at the production of urban space and taking as a premise the questioning of urban regeneration as an unchallenged remedy to social problems, these student's employed drawing - the most essential form of architectural communication - to investigate alternative possibilities of constructing urban proposals, architectural representation and meaning.

Socio-economic and phenomenological models of architectural and urban production were assessed by the group resulting in a number of drawings / mappings in order to establish programmes of intervention challenging conventional methods of urban planning.
The group produced their project with a high degree of independence, dynamically driving forward their process which resulted in a volume of work unusual at this level of study.

2001
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