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Saharan Network Project: [SNP]

Part 2 Project 2013
Richard Andrews
University for the Creative Arts Canterbury UK
The SNP is a proposal that would operate in complete isolation or in connection to the Saharan Forest Project [SFP], The Great Green Wall Association [GGWA] and The Trans-African Highways [TAH]; all projects that are invested in the development of the African continent.

This project is conceived as a contemporary Caravanserai traditionally allowing travellers to rest and recuperate after a long days travel. In turn it supports the flow of commerce and information as they are traditionally situated on trade routes. This proposal is the product of research into the traditional trades and trade routes and is designed to foster and sustain these activities, whilst providing resources for vital water, communications, power, vegetation and re-forestation in Saharan Africa.

Employing environmentally friendly components such as “Sporosarcina Pasteurii”, a natural occurring bacteria, to be used in a process of biological cementation to form sandstone out of loose sand will provide an alternative to carbon heavy foundation products such as concrete. This will allow the development and existence of 21st century technologies within such a challenging environment and maintain sustainability by using a low-impact and non-invasive process of construction.

CSP plants, CSP Furnaces, Air condensing units and protected nursery schemes will in turn aid struggling communities to deal with the demand for technological infrastructure whilst limiting the negative effects of these technologies on the breath-taking yet harsh environment which characterise Saharan Africa.

The introduction of these technologies and environmental programmes will, in all probability, produce an evolutionary change in traditional trade routes and be key in instigating a new supply framework for the necessary resources so that the area as a whole can evolve and develop with autonomy.

Richard Andrews

Tutor(s)
Mr John Bell
2013
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